Episode 46: Witches In Fiction With Zoraida Córdova

Witches love fiction and fiction loves Witches! Award-winning and New York Times Bestseller author Zoraida Córdova discusses her journey with Witchcraft and its influence on her fiction. She shares how Witchcraft and spirituality helped her build the world of her popular series: Brooklyn Brujas. We also discuss cultural context in creating a Magickal world and why readers keep returning to stories about Witches and Witchcraft. Digressions include: Vampires, Star Wars, “Charmed,” “Twilight,” “Buffy” and Luke Perry. Kanani talks about life in a house with COVID and Hilary talks about the use of yarrow. Plus, a psychic told our listener that they were “The Mother Gaia Incarnate.” What does THAT mean???

Our Guest Today

Credit: Sarah Elizabeth Younger

Zoraida Córdova is the author of many fantasy novels, including the award-winning Brooklyn Brujas series, Incendiary, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge: A Crash of Fate, and The Way to Rio Luna. Her short fiction has appeared in the New York Times bestselling anthology Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View, Star Wars: Clone Wars Stories of Light and Dark, and Come On In. She is the co-editor of Vampires Never Get Old. She is the co-host of the writing podcast, Deadline City, with Dhonielle Clayton. Zoraida was born in Guayaquil, Ecuador and raised in Queens, New York. When she’s not working on her next novel, she’s finding a new adventure.

Resource List

Zoraida Córdova Website
Brooklyn Brujas Series
Vampires Never Get Old
Vampires Never Get Old (The Podcast)
Julie Murphy
Star Wars: From A Certain Point Of View
Silver Ravenwolf
Coney Island Mermaid Parade
Our Conversation with Paige Vanderbeck
Green Witchcraft by Paige Vanderbeck
The Plant Spirit Familiar by Christopher Penczak

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Episode 42: Forest Magick with Jake Richards

Get your first 10-minute reading with Keen for only $1.99: https://trykeen.com/thatwitchlife. Because you deserve answers. Thank you to Keen for sponsoring this episode! The forest has been a place for Witch since, well, always! Author Jake Richards talks with us about the role of the forest in Magick and shares with us some of the Appalachian folkore and practices shaped by the forest. We discuss the sympathetic nature of the forest as well as respected it as an ecosystem both dangerous and vulnerable. We also touch on working with the Bible in Witchcraft and the role of faith in productive spellwork. Courtney shares some Blue Jay lore, Hilary talks about the Magickal uses of mint, and Kanani reviews “Witches of Eastwick” (and also how she is a sea hag). Plus, meet Walter the Angry Squirrel! We answer Listener questions: Is the Goddess Lilith related to Satan? What do you do when a spell works a little TOO well? For more stories from Jake that we just couldn’t fit in the episode, become a Patron today and get bonus content!

Our Guest Today

Jake Richards grew up in the foothills and mountains of East Tennessee, knee deep in creek mud one day and looking out from Big Ridge Mountain. He is melungeon, a group of tri-racial folks in the corner of East Tennessee who have always held magic and stories close to us. His maternal grandfather was a Freewill Baptist preacher who cured warts, charmed blood, talked out fire, and had the Sight. Most of his grandmothers “Dreamed True” and knew a remedy for just about anything that usually included Vics rub in some form. His Mama is a Seventh Daughter and has always had a healing touch, particularly with children. Her mother had the Sight and her father was the preacher. Jake’s Papaw’s mother, Mamaw Seagle, always had oil lamps burning with “dirt” in the basin as mama called it. Nana’s father, James, he believes was a conjuror of some sort, due to a photo they found of him posed before an old country back drop, holding a plastic doll baby wrapped in some kind of fabric with black feathers attached to the back of the doll. Jake’s grandfathers were farmers who planted by the signs, who carried roots and coon hats for good game in hunting, and water witched to located wells and springs with sunny-side twigs. As time has gone by and most of his elders have passed away, Jake has dedicated his life to the teaching, preservation, and practice of Appalachian Folk Magic and has worked these roots for little more than a decade. His knowledge is gleaned from family stories, his mother and grandmothers, and folks he’s come across growing up, and his own studies. Today most folks know him as old Buck or Dr. Buck.

Resource List

Jake Richards on Facebook
Little Chicago Conjure (Jake’s Website)
Jake Richards Twitter: @jakerichards131
Jake Richards IG
Jake email: littlechicagoconjure@yahoo.com
Jake blog: Holy Stones and Iron bones
Backwoods Witchcraft by Jake Richards
Folk Lore in the Old Testament
When God Was Queer Podcast
Blue Jay Lore
The Witches of Eastwick (Film)
A History of God by Karen Armstrong

Kanani’s Braggy-Pants Pics And Hilary’s Busted Ankle

Tillamook State Forest
Kanani’s Recording Studio
Mckenzie Falls
Hilary’s busted ankle

Support The Podcast

For bonus content and other goodies, support us on Patreon!
Buy us a coffee!
Get yourself some handmade merch!
Subscribe and/or rate and review us on ITunes!
Advertise with us!
Follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter and share our latest episodes on your social media portals!
Send us a message telling us what you love about the show, what you’d love to see us cover, or questions you’d love to have us answer.
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Thank you!!!


Episode 10: Magickal Herbs with Erika Fortner

“It’s the power behind the tool, not the tool.”

Herbs are a cornerstone of spells in Witchcraft, but they can be tricky! We are joined today by Erika Fortner who give us a whole list of fabulous herbs to use and how to use them in our spells, including the risks of using certain herbs. She also gives us a glimpse into the life of a Magick shop owner. We also talk about the personal responsibility in Witchcraft, mean people, dog snot, dangerous shapewear, and a Magick book you DON’T need to read. Plus, it’s Hilary’s birthday!!! ***Please note–the herbs discussed are for informational use, only. Please consult a medical practitioner before using herbs topically or internally.***

Our Guest Today

Erika Fortner, founder and Head Mistress of The House of Twigs, has been a Tarot reader, Witch, medium and Psychic for 23+ years. She is also the Head Mistress and Curator of THoT: The School of Ritual, Keven Craft Rituals, and the newest addition q. Meb (Queen Meb). She is an Artist with a BFA from Pratt Institute and has an extensive fine Art background in NYC with one of the top Artists in the world working with museums such as the MOMA and Guggenheim as well as living in Berlin, Germany and Venice, Italy. She is an eclectic energy worker (Reiki master as well as other healing modalities) Shamanic/folklore Witch; specializing in her own style of in-depth Tarot reading, crystal work, and channeling. She favors the Morrighan, Isis, Hecate, Freya, and Cernnunos. Erika’s inspiration of ritual comes from many areas, including her family lineage which connects to the first Kings of Ireland, Queen Maeb, the King of the Picts, as well as connections with the Welsh Lewellyn family, the Scottish McLaughlins, De Forsythe and McCloud clans. She has worked for the Psychic Friends network while in Brooklyn before deciding the ethos of the company didn’t align with her practice. She now has her roots planted in Portland, Oregon with her partner and daughter.

Resource List

Q Meb
Keven Craft Rituals
The House Of Twigs Blog and School
Witchvox
Damien Echols
Key of Solomon
Long Lost Friend
The Master Herbalism Book
Cunningham’s Book of Magickal Herbs